Frequently Asked Questions


What is Bloomberg Law and SCOTUSblog’s Supreme Court Challenge?

The Supreme Court Challenge is an opportunity for law students to compete against other law students and a team of experts from SCOTUSblog in a test of Supreme Court knowledge. Each team will predict the outcomes of 6 merits cases and 6 petitions for certiorari before the Supreme Court in April 2014 using research materials found on Bloomberg Law and SCOTUSblog.

How do I Enter?

Entry to the Challenge occurs in two parts:

Registration:

Students may register to compete in the Challenge until March 22, 2014 by visiting the Registration page. During this time, students will sign up and form teams of 1 to 5 people to compete in the Challenge.

Entry:

By March 31, 2014, student teams will submit their predictions on the Predictions page.

Who is eligible to enter?

The Challenge is open to all law students attending an ABA-accredited U.S. law school who are currently enrolled in a JD or LLM program, including part-time and joint degree programs.


What are the prizes?

First Place Winner:

The First Place team will win $3,500 for receiving the highest total points amongst all law student teams. If the 1st Place team’s score also beats the SCOTUSblog team, then they will win an additional prize of $1,500 for a total of $5,000.

Second Place Winner:

The Second Place team will win $1,500 for receiving the second highest total points amongst all law student teams. If the point score also beats the SCOTUSblog team, then the 2nd Place team will win an additional prize of $1,000 for a total of $2,500.

Third Place Winner:

The Third Place team will win $1,000 for receiving the third highest total points amongst all law student teams. If the point score also beats the SCOTUSblog team, then the 3rd Place team will receive an additional prize of $500 for a total of $1,500.

Regional Winners:

The top team in each region (excluding the overall top three teams nationally) will win $200.

How do I win?

Participating teams will receive points for correctly picking the outcome of 6 merits cases and the outcome of 6 petitions for certiorari. Prizes will be given to the top 3 scoring law student teams.

Points are awarded as follows:

For the 6 merits cases:

  • 5 points for correctly picking the winning party in each case
  • 2 points for correctly picking the overall Court vote (eg. 5-4)
  • ½ point for correctly selecting each Justice’s position on the case

For the 6 petitions for certiorari:

  • 3 points for correctly picking if a petition gets granted
  • 1 point for correctly picking if a petition gets denied
  • 5 points for correctly picking a call for the Solicitor General
  • 5 points for correctly picking a summary reversal
  • 3 points for correctly picking how the petition will be held

Tie Breaker: Student teams will be asked to predict the total number of days from the date that the first merits case is argued to the date that it is decided. The date that the case is argued, the date that the case is decided, holidays and weekends are all included in the total number of days. In the event of a tie, the winning student team whose prediction is closest to the number of days that it took to decide the case will win the prize. If there is a tie in the outcome of the tie breaker question, all winning student teams who tied in the tie-breaker question will evenly share the prize.

 

How do I submit my picks?

Team captains will choose all picks from dropdown menus in the Predictions tab.

Can I be on a team with my friend from a different law school?

No. You can only be on a team with other students from your law school.

Can I be on more than one team?

No. You may only register for one team.

Do I have to join a team?

Individuals can register and participate as a one member team. However, each team must complete all registration steps to participate.

Do I need a Bloomberg Law account to participate?

Yes. All students who compete in the Challenge must have active Bloomberg Law accounts. If you do not already have a Bloomberg Law account, please register for one.

How do I research on Bloomberg Law?

All participating students are required to complete a certification program on Bloomberg Law using their Bloomberg Law accounts. This will teach you how to research your predictions using news, Law Reports, dockets, court opinions, Justices’ profiles, and other resources. Need help? Here are ten tips on how to perform your research.

When do I find out if I won?

The Supreme Court decides merits cases and petitions for certiorari on a rolling basis throughout the term. Teams will be able to track their rankings throughout the competition as the Court decides different cases on the home page. Winners will be notified once the final petition or merits case is decided.

How will the prize be awarded?

All prizes will be paid out to the team captain on behalf of the winning team. The team captain is responsible for distributing the winnings to all team members.

Where I can I find the official rules of the Challenge?

The challenge rules can be found both on Bloomberg Law and here on the competition site.

How do I find information to make my predictions?

You may only use information housed on Bloomberg Law and SCOTUSblog to inform your predictions. Students may access videos on Bloomberg Law that will show you how to use the site to conduct research specific to the Challenge.

Who do I contact with questions?

For more information about using Bloomberg Law, please call our 24/7 help desk at 1-888-560-BLAW or email us at webhelp@bloomberg.net. You can also reach out to your Bloomberg Law Relationship Manager or Student Representative for any additional questions.

Who won the Challenge last year?

After a close race in what proved to be a very important term, Protect Sam Chase from St. Johns University School of Law came in first place, outscoring all other student teams and the expert team from SCOTUSblog with a score of 64.00 points! Close behind with a tie of 63.50 points each was Bro Bono from Indiana University – Bloomington, Maurer School of Law and Goldman St Johns School of Law from St. Johns University School of Law. After calculating the results of the tie breaker, Bro Bono came in second place and Goldman St Johns School of Law came in third, winning a prize of $1,500. For more information, please visit the 2013 Challenge Winner link at Bloomberg Law.